Hello Muskan, yes Co-Loader is a carrier (shipping company) that loads its cargo as part of an agreement between the lines on another lone ship. A co-loaded is a shipping company that has loading and unloading rights on ships that they do not operate, and they get this right from the carrier/operator of the ship by paying for slots on board that particular ship. This is different from a consortium or ship-sharing agreement. Thanks for this interesting article, but I would like to know if the co-charger is the same as Slot Charterer or if there is a difference?also how to differentiate between co-charger, Slot Charter, Consortium and Vessel Sharing Agreement. Thank you and apperciate your excellent work 🙂 thank you Co-Loading is the equivalent of Ridesharing for freight transport. This is the consolidation of shipments through several companies on the same transport vehicles. Companies can bundle truck (TL) shipments with LTL (Less-than-Truckload) shipments or multiple LTL shipments together or multiple TLs to produce jointly loaded shipments. For example, if A accepts the cargo from X and transfers the cargo again with B.B the goods to C, a primary carrier. In the port of destination, Z, who is the representative of C, delivers the cargo to Y, who is the representative of B in the port of loading.

At the destination port, Z collects the shipping costs of Y, Y the costs for the delivery order of X and X the costs for the delivery order of Y. There are two ways for companies to start co-loading: emails with certain prices go beyond the weekly price indices published by Drewry, Freightos or the Shanghai Shipping Exchange, indicating the actual prices between certain port pairs that allow a direct comparison with contract rates. Of course, contractual rates between BCOs and carriers are usually annualized rates, with capacity guarantees. Depending on the conditions negotiated, they can be adjusted downwards in the event of a decrease in spot interest rates. However, interest rate volatility can still be unfortunate for BCOs, which seek stability in the supply of shipping containers, and in recent weeks, some BCOs have openly stated that volatility undermines their direct relationships. Sometimes, those of you involved in container shipping may have found the terminology co-loader. You may have only found this if there is a problem with your container entering/exiting the port. I believe that loading goods with more than one carrier is not recommended in an LCL goods movement under imports and exports. Fauad Shariff, CEO of CoLoadX, said: “We can offer the best service and pricing options to NVOC of all sizes, other NVOCCs and carriers…

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