As part of the agreement, the British Parliament annulled the Government of Ireland Act 1920 (which had founded Northern Ireland, divided Ireland and asserted territorial rights to the whole of Ireland) and the people of the Republic of Ireland amended Articles 2 and 3 of the Irish Constitution, which asserted a territorial right to Northern Ireland. The previous text has only four articles; It is this short text that is the legal agreement, but it incorporates the last agreement into its timetables. [7] From a technical point of view, this draft agreement can be distinguished as a multi-party agreement, unlike the Belfast Agreement itself. [7] In 2004, negotiations took place between the two governments, the DUP and Sinn Féin, with a view to an agreement on how the institutions were organised. These talks failed, but a document released by governments detailing changes to the Belfast Agreement has been known as the “Global Agreement”. However, on 26 September 2005, it was announced that the Commissional Irish Republican Army had completely closed and “decommissioned” its weapons arsenal. Yet many trade unionists, especially the DUP, remained skeptical. Of the loyalist paramilitaries, only the Loyalist Volunteer Force (LVF) had taken weapons out of service. [21] Further negotiations took place in October 2006 and resulted in the St. Andrews Agreement.

The agreement reaffirmed its commitment to “mutual respect, civil rights and religious freedoms for all in the community.” The multi-party agreement recognised “the importance of respect, understanding and tolerance with regard to linguistic diversity”, in particular with regard to the Irish language, the Ulster Scots and the languages of other ethnic minorities in Northern Ireland, “all of which are part of the cultural richness of the island of Ireland”. The agreement contains a complex set of provisions in a number of areas, including: on Friday 10 April 1998 at 5.30 p.m., an American politician, George Mitchell, who led the talks, said: “I am pleased to announce that the two governments and the political parties of Northern Ireland have reached an agreement.” These institutional arrangements, which have been established in these three areas, are defined in the agreement as “interdependent and interdependent”. In particular, it is found that the functioning of the Northern Ireland Assembly and the North-South Council of Ministers is “so closely linked that the success of the other depends on the success of the other”, and participation in the North-South Council of Ministers is “one of the essential tasks related to the relevant posts in [Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland]”. The agreement called for the establishment of an independent commission to review the police regime in Northern Ireland, “including ways to promote broad community support” for these agreements. . . .

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